SAMPLE ACTIVITY USING EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

* For Grade 9 English

* Utah Core Standard Reading: Literature Standard 4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.

 

* Using Texting as a Technology Tool to Help Students Understand the Meaning of Language in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet (fulfilling Literature Core Standard 4):

After studying the dialogue of Romeo and Juliet, have students use a texting app (they may use the texting feature on their phones if needed) to rewrite a scene from the play. Divide students into groups that are the same number as the major characters in the selected scene, and have them work together as groups to create the text thread. The dialogue in the texts should accurately represent the meaning of the dialogue in Shakespeare's play but be written in words (and common text abbreviations) used by students today. 

* Formative Assessment of Romeo and Juliet Texting Activity Using Microsoft Teams:

Have each group share thier screens with the teacher on Microsoft Teams. The teacher can then either project the screen onto a whiteboard to assess as a class, or can look at it individually. The teacher reads the text (the data) and then, using the chat feature on Microsoft teams, gives quick feedback to the students. By giving them immediate feedback as they work on the project, they can then make the necessary changes to clarify or improve the project before it is due - thus optimizing the student outcomes for the project.

* Summative assessment using Floop:

Floop is a cloud-based website where students can get annotated feeback from the teacher and peers. Using their tech devices, students upload their rewritten text scene, and the teacher can directly comment on specific parts of the assignment, giving the students direct feedback as well as a grade. As Floop is a feedback-loop setup, the teacher then asks students to respond to the comments and questions. The teacher then uses these responses (data) to gain a clearer idea of what students understand and what they still need to learn.

Elizabeth Child ©2021